Free Easy Kite Building Plans


These free plans make it easy to build kites with inexpensive materials and common tools.


The kites are simple sled, flat diamond, bowed diamond, and delta wing. The plans are for small kites made of tissue paper and basswood sticks, medium kites made of gift wrapping paper and dowels, and a large kite made of polyethylene film and bamboo garden stakes.

Superior materials are available, but are more expensive. Rip-stop Nylon is more durable than paper or polyethylene film. Glass fiber tubes and carbon fiber tubes are lighter and stronger than wooden or bamboo sticks.

The large delta wing kite can be partially disassembled, making it more compact for storage and transport. There are no large diamond kites because they would be cumbersome. There is no large simple sled kite because air flow is stable only for smaller sizes.

The simple sled kites have two parallel sticks. The wind sucks the center up while the sides are anchored by the flying line, forming fins that align the kite with the wind. These kites are the least tolerant of shifting breezes.

The flat diamond kites have two crossing sticks. These kites have a tail that drags the kite into alignment with the wind. These kites are the most tolerant of stronger breezes.

The bowed diamond kites have two crossing sticks, with one stick bent into a bow. The bow forms a keel that aligns the kite with the wind. These kites are the most tolerant of shifting breezes.

The delta wing kites have four sticks. The side sticks are connected with a spreader stick. The wind sucks the sides up while the center stick is anchored by the flying line, forming a keel that aligns the kite with the wind. These kites are highly tolerant of both shifting breezes and stronger breezes.

To optimize the designs and make the instructions as simple and clear as possible, all nine kites were built and tested repeatedly. This procedure resulted in substantial changes in designs, construction techniques, and materials.

The construction knots are illustrated, but this might be inadequate for someone inexperienced with knots. Detailed knot-tying instructions are available on the internet.

Leonard Azar